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2 edition of digital computer model for predicting regional aquifer response found in the catalog.

digital computer model for predicting regional aquifer response

Tommy R. Knowles

digital computer model for predicting regional aquifer response

by Tommy R. Knowles

  • 113 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Texas Tech University, Water Resources Center] in [Lubbock .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Groundwater flow -- Mathematical models.,
  • Aquifers -- Mathematical models.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: leaves 59-60.

    Statementby Tommy R. Knowles, B. J. Claborn [and] Dan M. Wells.
    SeriesICASALS special report no. 52
    ContributionsClaborn, B. J., joint author., Wells, Dan M., 1926- joint author.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTD224.T4 T422 no. 71-7, TC179 T422 no. 71-7
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 129 l.
    Number of Pages129
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5395117M
    LC Control Number72612773

      The response time of changes in groundwater discharge to a change in recharge is a key aspect of predicting impacts of land‐use change on catchment water yield. Predicting these impacts across the large catchments relevant to water resource planning can require the estimation of groundwater response times from hundreds of aquifers. In arid regions, the groundwater drawdown consistently increases, and even for a constant pumping rate, long-term predictions remain a challenge. The present research applies the modular three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater flow (MODFLOW) model to a unique aquifer facing challenges of undefined boundary conditions. Artificial neural networks (ANN) and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference.

    Salinity increases in groundwater and surface water in the Arkansas River valley of southeastern Colorado are primarily related to irrigation practices. A digital computer model was developed to predict changes in dissolved solid concentration in response to spatially and temporally varying hydrologic stresses. The equations that describe the transient flow of groundwater and the transport . In this study, finite difference method is used to solve the equations that govern groundwater flow to obtain flow rates, flow direction and hydraulic heads through an aquifer. The aim therefore is to discuss the principles of Finite Difference Method and its applications in groundwater modelling. To achieve this, a rectangular grid is overlain an aquifer in order to obtain an exact solution.

    In digital modeling, on the other hand, once a general computer program has been prepared, data decks representing a wide variety of aquifers and aquifer conditions can be run with the same program. The effort involved in designing and keypunching a new data deck is much less than that involved in designing and building a new resistance. A digital-computer model for estimating hydrologic changes in the aquifer system in Dane County, Wisconsin() The Publications Warehouse does not have links to digital .


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Digital computer model for predicting regional aquifer response by Tommy R. Knowles Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Knowles, Tommy R. Digital computer model for predicting regional aquifer response. [Lubbock], [Texas Tech University, Water Resources Center] The difference amounts to only percent of the total flow.

Based on this comparison, it was decided the digital model was calibrated to a degree of accuracy sufficient to reproduce past events and that the model could therefore be used to predict future Aquifer conditions as a digital computer model for predicting regional aquifer response book in evaluating and developing management plans.

A digital‐computer program was written to solve these equations based upon an implicit finite‐difference technique. Calculated values compared favorably with analytical solutions for homogeneous, isotropic aquifers of simple geometry.

An analysis of an aquifer at Musquodoboit Harbour, Nova Scotia, was made using this by: Design of Analog Model for Aquifer Response Studies, Using a Digital Model Article in Ground Water 10(5) - 37 July with 17 Reads How we measure 'reads'. A digital computer program was developed to compare the actual pressure performance of aquifer systems to the calculated pressure behavior based on analytical analogs, and to select the analog which best fits the test data; and predict the pressure response of an aquifer discharging through one or more wells to help design proper lest Cited by: 1.

The computer model was used to predict the response of the aquifer system to the group test abstractions, for a total time period of days starting on the first day of abstraction and extending well into the recovery period follow- ing the cessation of both major abstractions and the compensation pumping.

The Edwards aquifer is a karst system which lies in a broad arc across central Texas, USA. The portion of the aquifer located just south of the City of Austin is a hydrologically separate system (the darkly shaded area in Fig.

1), which discharges primarily at Barton portion of the aquifer provides drinking water to about 35 residents in areas without access to the city.

Numerical models have been an integral component in management of the Edwards Aquifer for over four decades. The scale and complexity of the models have varied considerably during this time, with the changes attributed to improvements in both numerical software and the conceptual models on which the models are predicated.

Potential applications of the model include flood prediction, comparative studies of basin response in a regional context, and estimation of actual evapotranspiration. View Show abstract.

PNAS Post Nubian Aquifer System RC Regional Coordinator RIGW Research Institute for Digital Computer Models for Designing Well Fields in the Libyan Sahara.

Proceedings of the International Conf. On Computer Applications in M. (): Preliminary Pumping lift predictions of the Kufra Well Fields, Ohio University, Athens Ohio, USA, 2.

Normally, models are classified as predictive, interpretive and generic models. Predictive models are used to predict the future response of the aquifer, which needs a calibrated and validated model. Interpretive models are used for studying system dynamics and. The basic behavior of the model is characterized by two response times, one associated with the hydraulics and the other with the solute.

obtained by digital computer simulation, are found to be in reasonable agreement with observed trends over a 15‐year period. Mat Gilfedder, Warrick R. Dawes and David W. Rassam, Predicting Aquifer. used for generating response predictions effec- t,ively by simulating the aquifer and its bound- ary conditions that are highly variable in time and space.

Digital computers.-Where. analytical solu- t,ions are expressed in integral form, the digital computer is effective for numerically evaluating. used to predict the response of the aquifer system to man-induced stresses such as pumping withdrawal or artificial recharge.

New plans of irrigation or methods of recharge can be tried by merely changing the rates of withdrawal or recharge in the model. Such computer-model predictions are rapid and relatively inexpensive.

Murray‐James Verge, Design of Analog Model for Aquifer Response Studies, Using a Digital Model, Groundwater, 10, 5, (), (). Wiley Online Library Volume 8, Issue 1. The model is applied to simulate the impact of highway deicing salts on ground‐water quality in eastern Massachusetts.

The results, obtained by digital computer simulation, are found to be in reasonable agreement with observed trends over a 15‐year period.

Quantifying aquifer properties and freshwater resource in coastal barriers: a hydrogeophysical approach applied at Sasihithlu (Karnataka state, India). Hydrology. describes only one specific aquifer. In digital modeling, on the other hand, once a '1 general computer program has been prepared, data decks representing a wide vari- 1 ety of aquifers and aquifer conditions can be run with the same program.

The effort involved in designing and keypunching a new data deck is much less than. The worth of additional data to a digital model of the Tucson basin, Arizona, was computed by using a basic form of statistical decision theory. The model variables for which additional data were h.

5) Verify the aquifer model. The digital computer model has been used successfully in the past to predict aquifer response to various pumping schemes.

In several areas of heavy groundwater withdrawals, however, severe dewatering of the Galena-Platteville Formation and sometimes even the St. Peter Sandstone has occurred. opment of a digital computer simulation model of the deep sandstone aquifer underlying the Region.

The request was precipitated by a growing concern on the part of the Waukesha Water Utility that increased withdrawals could produce adverse long-rangeeffects on the cost ofthe public water supply that should be carefully evaluated.The tank model developed by Sugawara () for runoff analysis was used to simulate seasonal changes of the table.

The main reasons for using the tank model as a soil water subsystem are to evaluate the value of storativity of the aquifer and to give a time lag between input (infiltration) and output (groundwater response).Computer models for understanding and predicting hydraulics and contaminant transport in aquifers make assumptions about the distribution and hydraulic properties of geologic features that may not always apply to karst aquifers.

This paper reviews the basic concepts, mathematical descriptions, and modeling approaches for karst systems.